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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. -- it was in the 1990's. because we are more competitive on energy prices and people are saying we will be relatively competitively on the energy price component and construction and cost, i think there is reasonable evidence we are starting to pull in more manufacturing. we may have hit the bottom the started in 1979. there is a reason for hope. i think the metaphor is the automobile out. there might even be more policy there. i cannot imagine if there is an aggressive policy on manufacturing and construction -- that is another word for infrastructure, and there might be some hope, especially for less skilled mails. >> i am glad anthony mentioned energy cost. we have done even mention climate change, which i think is going to be -- it all way -- already is a major issue for the world to face. it will only grow in importance and significance. looking at the development boom and the potential for shell gas and shale oil is a real opportunity and challenge. an opportunity for significant economic growth, an opportunity to move away from dirtier fossil fuels and maybe served as a bridge into renewable e
of energy sector and pro growth strategy from government. neil: it seemsnevitable that tax increases will be a part of the deal, whether a return to clintonnary top rates or -- era top rates or something in between oadjusting deductions or write-offs, but one way shape or form, taxes on the upper income will rise. >> it does not make sense, first of all, taxes are already going up on everyone, because of obamacare, when you add to that the tax increase that president is proposing, the rates are much higher than clinton era. >> you would go against what boehner has been saying. >> i do not know, i will not undermine what he said, i am saying this does not make sense, taxing will be higher. and president is proud of the unemployment. labor pool shrank. so, if unemployment went down, under existing tax rates, why would we raise taxes if president believes that jobs are being created and the economy is growing with the current tax rates why would he risk that by changing the tax rates. that is why this makes no sense to me, it makes no sense other than he wants to score a victory for the
doing to get it back? we're drilling for more oil at home. that could mean more jobs. today the energy information administration said american crude oil production averaged 6.5 million barrels a day in september. that is the best, people, in 15 years. and now our fifth story "outfront." >>> we go from a good story to a bad one. the fiscal cliff. dissension within the ranks. it seems not recall republican lawmakers and conservative groufs are in lockstep with john boehner. earlier i spoke with one gop house member who hasn't been on the same wave length as the speaker recently. he's in senior leadership. here's what deputy whip congressman tom cole told me about those who in the party say taxes shouldn't be on the table. >> for those who say we're putting revenue on the table, the american people did that when they lented, you know, the president and a democratic senate again. again, they have to agree to a deal or tax rates on everybody go up. i think we shouldn't -- we should do everything we can to avoid that for as many people as we possibly can. >> "outfront" tonight, grover norq
his mother will be mourned by countless australians whose lives she has touched. her energy and personal commitment made our country a more hopeful place and she'll be missed by many. bill: what a life. martha: 77 direct descendants is remarkable. bill: remember the good times, they are all good times. 16 minutes past the hour. an 8-day strike that brought two of the nation's busiest ports to a grinding halt is over. a tentative deal brokered by l.a.'s mayor means the clerks are set to return to work today. >> we took on these challenges and tonight we are able to reach an agreement. my 10,000 long shore workers in the ports of l.a.-long beach will start moving cargo on these ships. bill: this strike had a huge impact on the national economy. these two ports have a 44% of the nation's sea cargo. it includes cars out of japan and china. john fund, coauthor of the book "who's counting." you want a raise? you want a clerical worker? the money is pretty good. $87,000 a year. $105,000 with a compensation package. one of the top u.s. blue collar jobs. >> the outrageous thing about
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)